A New Karaite-Turkish Manuscript from Germany: New Light on Genre and Language in Karaite and Rabbanite Turkic Bible Translations in the Crimea, Constantinople and Elsewhere

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Dan Shapira

Abstract

A Karaite manuscript in Istanbuli Turkish written in Hebrew characters has turned up in Germany lately. This article investigates the whereabouts of the manuscript and tries to place it in its historical and linguistic context. Although the manuscript was apparently written/copied in Constantinople, the Turkic language used in it has some Crimean connections. The novelty of this discovery lies in the fact that Turkish was used by the 19th century Constantinople Karaites as a literary language.

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How to Cite
Shapira, D. (2014). A New Karaite-Turkish Manuscript from Germany: New Light on Genre and Language in Karaite and Rabbanite Turkic Bible Translations in the Crimea, Constantinople and Elsewhere. Karaite Archives, (2), 143-176. https://doi.org/10.14746/ka.2014.2.07
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Articles
Author Biography

Dan Shapira, Bar-Ilan University

obtained his PhD in 2000 on Studies in Zoroastrian Exegesis: Zand (in English, two volumes) under the supervision of Prof. Shaul Shaked, HUJI; and since 2013 has had the post of full professor, at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, and is the Feldman Professor of the History and Culture of Eastern European Jewry, Faculty of Jewish Studies, Bar-Ilan University, Israel.

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