Textualism, Materialism, Immersion, Interpretation

Main Article Content

Krzysztof Uniłowski

Abstrakt

Krzysztof Uniłowski passed away earlier this December. For the last twenty years, he has been crucial to Polish literary studies. Writing on a broad range of topics – from reviews of contemporary Polish novels to essays on the idea of modernity, from class-oriented analyses of sci-fi books and TV shows to comments on the politics and ethics of literary criticism – he developed an impressive and highly unique critical perspective, or indeed: a unique language of criticism, one that has managed and will undoubtedly still manage to inspire countless critics of all generations. Throughout his work, Uniłowski drew heavily on historical materialism, constantly balancing his instinctive focus on the political – and, specifically, on class – with his equally instinctive conviction as to the irreplaceability of literary form. While we might not have agreed on every single issue – as is always the case on the Left – we in “Praktyka Teoretyczna” are proud to have called him not just an inspiration, but a comrade. Uniłowski passed away while putting finishing touches to the essay we’re presenting below. Unfortunately, he never managed to send us the finished abstract/summary for this article, so it falls to us to try and summarise its main theses. Krzysztof Uniłowski passed away earlier this December. For the last twenty years, he has been crucial to Polish literary studies. Writing on a broad range of topics – from reviews of contemporary Polish novels to essays on the idea of modernity, from class-oriented analyses of sci-fi books and TV shows to comments on the politics and ethics of literary criticism – he developed an impressive and highly unique critical perspective, or indeed: a unique language of criticism, one that has managed and will undoubtedly still manage to inspire countless critics of all generations. Throughout his work, Uniłowski drew heavily on historical materialism, constantly balancing his instinctive focus on the political – and, specifically, on class – with his equally instinctive conviction as to the irreplaceability of literary form. While we might not have agreed on every single issue – as is always the case on the Left – we in “Praktyka Teoretyczna” are proud to have called him not just an inspiration, but a comrade. Uniłowski passed away while putting finishing touches to the essay we’re presenting below. Unfortunately, he never managed to send us the finished abstract/summary for this article, so it falls to us to try and summarise its main theses.Krzysztof Uniłowski passed away earlier this December. For the last twenty years, he has been crucial to Polish literary studies. Writing on a broad range of topics – from reviews of contemporary Polish novels to essays on the idea of modernity, from class-oriented analyses of sci-fi books and TV shows to comments on the politics and ethics of literary criticism – he developed an impressive and highly unique critical perspective, or indeed: a unique language of criticism, one that has managed and will undoubtedly still manage to inspire countless critics of all generations. Throughout his work, Uniłowski drew heavily on historical materialism, constantly balancing his instinctive focus on the political – and, specifically, on class – with his equally instinctive conviction as to the irreplaceability of literary form. While we might not have agreed on every single issue – as is always the case on the Left– we in “Praktyka Teoretyczna” are proud to have called him not just an inspiration, but a comrade. Uniłowski passed away while putting finishing touches to the essay we’re presenting below. Unfortunately, he never managed to send us the finished abstract/summary for this article, so it falls to us to try and summarise its main theses. The issues raised in this erudite and formally complex piece include such fundamental questions as: in what sense do the fictional worlds resemble the non-fictional one, and how do we inhabit them? What’s the relationship between immersion and interpretation? What real-life figures can help us imagine or visualise our intimate yet inherently social relationship with the fictional (are we guests, dwellers, passersby...)? Uniłowski looks for answers in contemporary Marxist criticism (Eagleton, Jameson, Berardi), sci-fi and fantasy writing (Lem, Sapkowski, Martin), as well as modern continental philoso phy (Gadamer, Heidegger) and – in the last part of the essay – contemporary game studies. We’re happy to be able to present Uniłowski’s piece in two versions, the original Polish as well as its English translation (by Jakob Ziguras). In order to preserve the unmistakable flow of Uniłowski’s thought in English, small changes were introduced – with the author’s full approval – in the English version. We trust that our Polish-speaking readers will fin the comparison of the two versions interesting and instruc tive, as they seem to give a unique insight into Uniłowski’s writing process.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

Jak cytować
Uniłowski, K. (2019). Textualism, Materialism, Immersion, Interpretation. Praktyka Teoretyczna, 34(4), 13-31. https://doi.org/10.14746/prt2019.4.2
Dział
KRYTYKA MATERIALISTYCZNA: NOWE PODEJŚCIA
Biogram autora

Krzysztof Uniłowski, University of Silesia in Katowice

KRZYSZTOF UNIŁOWSKI (1967–2019) – literary critic and professor of literary studies, he taught at the University of Silesia in Katowice. He wrote extensively on subjects such as the politics of literary form, history of modern literature and art, and the relationship between literary modernism and science fiction. He published nine books and received the prestigious Kazimierz Wyka Award in 2010.

Bibliografia

  1. Barthes, Roland (1977). „From Work to Text.” In: Roland Barthes: Image, Music, Text. Trans. Stephen Heath. London: Fontana Press.
  2. Berardi Franco „Bifo” (2012). The Uprising: on Poetry and Finance. Los Angeles: Semiotext(e).
  3. Eagleton, Terry (1996). Illusions of Postmodernism. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
  4. Gadamer, Hans-Georg (1989). Truth and Method. Trans. Joel Weinsheimer & Donald G. Marshall. London: Sheed & Ward.
  5. Geier, Manfred (1989). „’Eden’: elementy semiologii ‘pozaziemskiej’”, trans. Zdzisław Wawrzyniak.” In: Lem w oczach krytyki światowej, ed. Jerzy Jarzębski. Kraków: Wydawnictwo Literackie, p. 104-141.
  6. Herman, David; Jahn, Manfred & Ryan, Marie-Laure (2008). Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory. London-New York: Routledge Jameson, Fredric (1991). Postmodernism, or, the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism. Durham: Duke Univeristy Press.
  7. Kłosiński, Michał (2017a). „Poezja jako utopijna alternatywa dla nowomowy liberalnej” In: Ekonomiczne teorie literatury. Katowice: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego.
  8. Kłosiński, Michał (2017b). „Zamieszkując wirtualne światy”. Śląskie Studia Polonistyczne, 1 (9), p. 69-88.
  9. Kłosiński, Michał (2018). Hermeneutyka gier wideo: interpretacja, immersja, utopia. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo IBL PAN.
  10. Kubiński, Piotr (2016). Gry wideo: zarys poetyki. Kraków: TAiWPN „Universitas”.
  11. Kubiński, Piotr (2014). „Emmersja - antyiluzyjny wymiar gier wideo” Nowe Media, 4, p. 161-176.
  12. Kuźniarz, Bartosz (2011). Goodbye Mr. Postmodernism: teorie społeczne myślicieli późnej lewicy. Toruń: Wydawnictwo Naukowe UMK.
  13. Lem, Stanisław (1990). Eden. Trans. Marc E. Heine. London: Andre Deutsch.
  14. Maj, Krzysztof M. (2018). „Habitaty fikcji: narratologia transmedialna w badaniach nad światotwórstwem,” doctoral dissertation supervised by Anna Łebkowska. Kraków: Jagiellonian University, Department of Polish Studies.
  15. Maj, Krzysztof M. (2015). „Czas światoodczucia: imersja jako nowa poetyka odbioru.” Teksty Drugie, 3, p. 368-394.
  16. Martin, George R.R. (2011) Game of Thrones. London: Harper Collins.
  17. Prejzner, Katarzyna (2009). Tekst jako świat i gra: modele narracyjności w kulturze współczesnej. Łódź: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego.
  18. Sapkowski, Andrzej (2001). Coś się kończy, coś się zaczyna. Warszawa: Supernowa.
  19. Schor, Naomi (1994). „The Essentialism which is Not One: Coming to Grips with Irigaray.” In: Essential Difference, ed. Naomi Schor & Elizabeth Weed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  20. Sławek, Tadeusz; Kunce, Aleksandra & Kadłubek, Zbigniew (2013).
  21. Oikologia: nauka o domu. Katowice: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego.
  22. Stone, Alison (2006). Luce Irigaray and The Philosophy of Sexual Difference. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  23. Szopa, Katarzyna (2018). Poetyka rozkwitania: różnica płciowa w filozofii Luce Irigaray. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo IBL PAN.