Transfiguracje czasoprzestrzeni. Pojęcie Tabor w rewolucji husyckiej i jego implikacje dla filozofii historii

Main Article Content

Jakub Kowalewski

Abstrakt

Ten artykuł ma za zadanie ukazać sposób w jaki średniowieczna teologia polityczna i współczesna filozofia historii są w stanie wzajemnie się uzupełniać. W tym celu przedstawiam koncept „Taboru” – pojęcia które wyłoniło się wśród radyklanych husytów, zwanych taborytami, w trakcie rewolucji husyckiej na terenie średniowiecznych Czech i Moraw. Moim zdaniem teologiczno-polityczny koncept Taboru stawia pod znakiem zapytania współczesne filozofie, które traktują historię w pojęciach czasu, poprzez ukazanie niewystarczalności czysto „czasowego” podejścia do historycznych idei i doświadczeń. Aby z powodzeniem nakreślić koncept Taboru, powinniśmy rozumieć historię jako strukturę nie tylko czasową, ale również przestrzenną i ideologiczną. Równocześnie studium historyczne kierujące się filozoficznymi kategoriami ideologii, przestrzeni i czasu pozwala na rozbudowanie naszego rozumienia husyckiej teologii politycznej poprzez uwidocznienie pojęć i doświadczeń, które pozostają niezidentyfikowane czy to w analizach wyłącznie ideologicznych, jedynie przestrzennych lub czysto czasowych.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

Jak cytować
Kowalewski, J. (2021). Transfiguracje czasoprzestrzeni. Pojęcie Tabor w rewolucji husyckiej i jego implikacje dla filozofii historii. Praktyka Teoretyczna, 39(1), 161-186. https://doi.org/10.14746/prt2021.1.8
Dział
SUBVERSIVE CONCEPTS: EMPIRES AND BEYOND
Biogram autora

Jakub Kowalewski, University of Winchester

Jakub is the editor of The Environmental Apocalypse: Interdisciplinary Reflections on the Climate Crisis (Routledge, under contract), and an author of articles on political ontology, philosophy of mind, and philosophyof literature.

Bibliografia

  1. Agamben, Giorgio. 2017. The Omnibus Homo Sacer. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.
  2. Althusser, Louis. 1969. “Marxism and Humanism.” In For Marx. Translated by Ben Brewster, 219‒47. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.
  3. Althusser, Louis. 1990. “Theory, Theoretical Practice and Theoretical Formation: Ideology and Ideological Struggle.” In Philosophy and the Spontaneous Philosophy of the Scientists & Other Essays, edited with an introduction by Gregory Elliott. Translated by Ben Brewster, James H. Kavanagh, Thomas E. Lewis, Grahame Lock, Warren Montag, 1‒42. London: Verso.
  4. Bartlová, Milena. 2016. “Hussite Iconoclasm.” In From Hus to Luther: Visual Culture in the Bohemian Reformation (1380–1620), edited by Kateřina Horníčková and Michal Šroněk, 57‒70. Turnhout: Brepols.
  5. Bellitto, Christopher M., and David Zachariah Flanagin ed. 2012. Reassessing Reform: A Historical Investigation into Church Renewal. Washington: Catholic University of America Press.
  6. Bookchin, Murray. 1982. The Ecology of Freedom: The Emergence and Dissolution of Hierarchy. Palo Alto: Cheshire Books.
  7. Brušák, Karel. 1998. “Reflections of Heresy in Czech Fourteenth- and Fifteenth-Century Rhymed Compositions.” The Slavonic and East European Review 76(2): 241‒65.
  8. Buck, Lawrence P. 2011. “‘Anatomia Antichristi’: Form and Content of the Papal Antichrist.” The Sixteenth Century Journal 42(2): 349‒68.
  9. Cermanová, Pavlina. 2020. “The Apocalyptic Background of Hussite Radicalism.” In A Companion to the Hussites, edited by Michael Van Dussen and Pavel Soukup, 187‒218 Leiden: Brill.
  10. Christianson, Gerald. 2012. “Church, Bible, and Reform in the Hussite Debates at the Council of Basel, 1433.” In Reassessing Reform: A Historical Investigation into Church Renewal, edited by Christopher M. Bellitto and David Zachariah Flanagin, 124‒48 Washington: Catholic University of America Press.
  11. Frassetto, Michael. 2007. Heretic Lives: Medieval Heresy from Bogomil and the Cathars to Wyclif and Hus. London: Profile Books.
  12. Fudge, Thomas A. 1994. “The State of Hussite Historiography.” Mediaevistik 7: 93‒117.
  13. Fudge, Thomas A. 1998. “‘Neither Mine Nor Thine:’ Communist Experiments in Hussite Bohemia.” Canadian Journal of History 33(1): 25‒47.
  14. Fudge, Thomas A. 2010. Jan Hus: Religious Reform and Social Revolution in Bohemia. London: I.B. Tauris.
  15. Fudge, Thomas A. 2020. Origins of the Hussite Uprising: The Chronicle of Laurence of Březová (1414–1421). Abingdon: Routledge.
  16. Gadamer, Hans-Georg. 2013. Truth and Method. Translated by Donald G. Marshall. London: Bloomsbury.
  17. Grant, Jeanne E. 2015. For the Common Good: The Bohemian Land Law and the Beginning of the Hussite Revolution. Leiden: Brill.
  18. Haberkern, Philip N. 2016. Patron Saint and Prophet: Jan Hus in the Bohemian and German Reformations. New York: Oxford University Press.
  19. Kateřina Horníčková, and Michal Šroněk, ed. 2016. From Hus to Luther: Visual Culture in the Bohemian Reformation (1380–1620). Turnhout: Brepols.
  20. Husserl, Edmund. 1981. “The Foundational Investigations of the Phenomenological Origin of the Spatiality of Nature.” In Husserl: Shorter Works, edited by Peter McCormick and Frederick A. Elliston. Translated by F. Kersten, 222‒33. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
  21. Husserl, Edmund. 1989. “The Origin of Geometry.” In Edmund Husserl’s Origin of Geometry: An Introduction by Jacques Derrida. Translated by David Carr, 157‒80. London: University of Nebraska Press.
  22. Jaritz, Gerhard, and Gerson Moreno-Riaño, ed. 2003. Time and Eternity: The Medieval Discourse. Turnhout: Brepols.
  23. Kalivoda, Robert. 2014. “The Social Outcome of the Hussite Revolution.” In Between Lipany and White Mountain: Essays in Late Medieval and Early Modern Bohemian History in Modern Czech Scholarship, edited by James R. Palmitessa, 43‒62. Leiden: Brill.
  24. Kaminsky, Howard. 1957. “Chiliasm and the Hussite Revolution.” Church History 26(1): 43‒71.
  25. Kaminsky, Howard. 1967. A History of the Hussite Revolution. Berkley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  26. Klassen, John. 1990. “The Disadvantaged and the Hussite Revolution.” International Review of Social History 35(2): 249‒72.
  27. Klassen, John. 1981. “Women and Religious Reform in Late Medieval Bohemia.”
  28. Renaissance and Reformation / Renaissance et Réforme, New Series / Nouvelle Série 5(4): 203‒21.
  29. Kleinberg, Ethan. 2017. Haunting History: For a Deconstructive Approach to the Past. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  30. Koselleck, Reinhart. 2004. Future Pasts: On the Semantics of Historical Time. Translated by Keith Tribe. New York: Columbia University Press.
  31. Lahey, Stephen E. 2019. The Hussites. Leeds: Arc Humanity Press.
  32. Lerner, Robert E. 1972. The Heresy of the Free Spirit in the Later Middle Ages. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
  33. Macek, Josef. 1958. The Hussite Movement in Bohemia. Prague: Orbis.
  34. Malia, Martin. 2008. History’s Locomotives: Revolutions and the Making of the Modern World. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  35. Marchart, Oliver. 2014. “Institution and Dislocation: Philosophical Roots of Laclau’s Discourse Theory of Space and Antagonism.” Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory Institution 15 (3): 271–82.
  36. Massey, Doreen. 2005. For Space. London: Sage.
  37. Matula, Jozef. 2003. “The Understanding of Time and Eternity in the Philosophy of Magister John Hus.” In Time and Eternity: The Medieval Discourse, edited by Gerhard Jaritz and Gerson Moreno-Riaño, 223‒32. Turnhout: Brepols.
  38. McGinn, Bernard. 1979. Visions of the End: Apocalyptic Traditions in the Middle Ages. New York: Columbia University Press.
  39. Nodl, Martin. 2016. “The Hussites and the Bohemian Reformation.” In From Hus to Luther: Visual Culture in the Bohemian Reformation (1380–1620), edited by Kateřina Horníčková and Michal Šroněk, 17‒46. Turnhout: Brepols.
  40. Palacký, František. 2007. “History of the Czech Nation in Bohemia and Moravia.” Translated by D. Paton. In Discourses of Collective Identity in Central and Southeast Europe (1770-1945): Texts and Commentaries, vol. 2: National Romanticism: The Formation of National Movements, edited by Balázs Trencsényi and Michal Kopeček, 50‒56. Budapest: Central European University Press.
  41. Palmitessa, James R., ed. 2014. Between Lipany and White Mountain: Essays in Late Medieval and Early Modern Bohemian History in Modern Czech Scholarship. Leiden: Brill.
  42. Rychterová, Pavlína. 2020. “Preaching, the Vernacular, and the Laity.” In A Companion to the Hussites, edited by Michael Van Dussen and Pavel Soukup, 297‒330. Leiden: Brill.
  43. Schulz-Forberg, Hagen. 2013. “The Spatial and Temporal Layers of Global History: A Reflection on Global Conceptual History through Expanding Reinhart Koselleck’s ‘Zeitschichten’ into Global Spaces.” Historical Social Research 38(3): 40‒58.
  44. Šmahel, František. 2015. “The National Idea, Secular Power and Social Issues in the Political Theology of Jan Hus.” In A Companion to Jan Hus, edited by František Šmahel and Ota Pavlíček, 214‒53. Leiden: Brill.
  45. Šmahel, František, and Ota Pavlíček, eds. 2015. A Companion to Jan Hus. Leiden: Brill.
  46. Trencsényi, Balázs, and Michal Kopeček, eds. 2007. Discourses of Collective Identity in Central and Southeast Europe (1770-1945): Texts and Commentaries, vol. 2: National Romanticism: The Formation of National Movements. Budapest: Central European University Press.
  47. Van Dussen, Michael, and Pavel Soukup, eds. 2020. A Companion to the Hussites. Leiden: Brill.
  48. Zeman, Jarold Knox. 1976. “Restitution and Dissent in the Late Medieval Renewal Movements: The Waldensians, the Hussites and the Bohemian Brethren.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 44(1): 7‒27.