Human trafficking and the African woman: A critical study of Darko’s Beyond the horizon and Adimora-Ezeigbo’s Trafficked

Main Article Content

Margaret Fafa Nutsukpo

Abstract

Globalization, gender inequality and poverty render African women vulnerable to trafficking; this is explored by Darko and Adimora-Ezeigbo in their novels. From the feminist perspective, this article analyzes the authors’ portrayal of trafficking, factors and structures that sustain it, and the significance of the construction of self-narratives during victim’s rehabilitation. It also proffers preventive strategies and effective avenues for victims’ rehabilitation and reintegration into society.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

How to Cite
Nutsukpo, M. F. (2019). Human trafficking and the African woman: A critical study of Darko’s Beyond the horizon and Adimora-Ezeigbo’s Trafficked. Journal of Gender and Power, 12(2), 117-135. https://doi.org/10.14746/jgp.2019.12.007
Section
ARTICLES

References

  1. ADIMORA-EZEIGBO, A. (2008) Trafficked. Lagos: Lantern Books.
  2. BARRY, K. (1995) The prostitution of sexuality. New York: University Press.
  3. BINDMAN, J. (1998) An international perspective on slavery in the sex industry. In: Kempadoo, K. & Doezema, J. (eds.) Global sex workers: rights, resistance, and redefinition (pp. 65–68). New York: Routledge.
  4. BRISON, S. J. (2002) Outliving oneself: trauma, memory, and personal identity. In: Mui, C. L. & Murphy, J. S. (eds.) Gender struggles: practical approaches to contemporary feminism (pp. 137–165). Oxford, England: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  5. BROWN, L. S. (2011–2016) Treating trauma: basic skills and specific treatments. [Online] Available from: https://www.continuingedcourses.net/active/courses/course073.php. [Accessed: 15th September 2018].
  6. BROWN, W. (2002) A human rights approach to the rehabilitation and reintegration into society of trafficked victims. The human rights conference on 21st century slavery—the human rights dimension to trafficking, Rome, 15–16 May 2002. [Online] Available from: https://www.hrw.org/legacy/backgrounder/wrd/index.htm. [Accessed: 7th September 2018].
  7. BURN, S. M. (2005) Women across cultures: a global perspective. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill.
  8. CHASEN, L. E. (2010) Dislocated subjects: transnational forced prostitution, African female bodies and corporeal resistance. Thesis (MA), Georgetown University. [Online] Available from: https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/handle/10822/552992. [Accessed: 18th September 2018].
  9. DARKO, A. (1995) Beyond the horizon. Harlow, Essex: Heinemann.
  10. FRIAS, M. (2002) Women on top: prostitution and pornography in Amma Darko’s Beyond the horizon. Wasafiri. 17 (37). Pp. 8–13.
  11. FUBARA, A. M. (2013) Rhythm of violence in Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo’s Trafficked. International Journal of Law and Conflict Resolution. 1 (1). Pp. 7–11.
  12. KEMPADOO, K. (1998) Globalizing sex workers’ rights. In: Kempadoo, K. & Doezema, J. (eds.) Global sex workers: rights, resistance, and redefinition (pp. 1–28). New York: Routledge.
  13. LADELE, O. A. (2016) Globalization and African women’s bodies: some fictional representations. International Journal of English and Literature. 7 (8). Pp. 135–142.
  14. LORBER, J. (2005) Gender inequality: feminist theories and politics. 3rd ed. Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing Company.
  15. MEYERS, D. T. (2016) Victims of trafficking, reproductive rights, and asylum. In: Francis, L. (ed.) Oxford handbook of reproductive ethics. DOI:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199981878.013.5.
  16. MOOREHEAD, C. (2007) Women and children for sale. The New York Review of Books. [Online] 11th October. Available from: http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2007/10/11/women-and-children-for-sale/. [Accessed: 7th September 2018].
  17. MUI, C. L. & MURPHY, J. S. (eds.) (2002) Gender struggles: practical approaches to contemporary feminism. Oxford, England: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  18. NADASWARAN, S. (2011) Neo-liberal Nigeria and sex trafficking in Nigerian women’s writings. [Online] Available from http://www.ipedr.com/vol20/53-ICHSC2011-M10051.pdf. [Accessed: 20th September 2018].
  19. PARNELL, L. (1997) Transforming trauma: EMDR. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  20. SOOVA, K. (2015) Role of restrictive migration policies in increasing the vulnerability of migrants to irregularity, exploitation and trafficking. The OSCE 15th alliance against trafficking in persons conference. Vienna, 6–7 July 2015. [Online] Available from: http://www.osce.org/secretariat/173571?download=true. [Accessed: 2nd September 2018].
  21. UGWANYI, D. M. (2017) Subverting the patriarchal narrative of the female character in the African novel: a feminist reading of Amma Darko’s novels. Covenant Journal of Language Studies. 5 (1). Pp. 48–64.
  22. UMEZURIKE, U. P. (2015) Objectification in Amma Darko’s Beyond the horizon. Journal of Pan-Africa Studies. 8 (2). Pp. 290–301.
  23. UNITED NATIONS. UNITED NATIONS HUMAN RIGHTS OFFICE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER (2016) Debt bondage remains the most prevalent form of forced labour worldwide. Geneva: United Nations. [Online] Available from: http://www.ap.ohchr.org/documents/dpage_e.aspx?si=A/HRC/33/46. [Accessed: 20th September 2015].
  24. UNITED NATIONS. UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME (2018) What is human trafficking? Geneva: United Nations. [Online] Available from: http://www.unodc/en/human-trafficking/what-is--human-trafficking.html. [Accessed: 20th September 2018].
  25. WIJERS, M. (1998) Women labor, and migration: the position of trafficked women and strategies for support. In: Kempadoo, K. & Doezema, J. (eds.) Global sex workers: rights, resistance, and redefinition. New York: Routledge. Pp. 70–78.
  26. WILKINSON, A. (2017) Women will keep being exploited if we don’t give them the economic security they need. New Statesman. 19th July. [Online] Available from: http://www.newstateman.com/politics/feminism/2017/07/women-will-keepbeing-exploited-if-we-dont-give-them-economic-security. [Accessed: 12th September 2018].