Seneca and Synaesthesia. The sensory aspect of the tragedies

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Joanna Pypłacz

Abstrakt

The present article discusses selected examples of the poetic means which Seneca uses in order to achieve the effect of synaesthesia in his tragedies. An analysis of these examples reveals that the poet makes the most of the Latin language’s semantic and musical potential and in doing so achieves quite spectacular sensory effects.

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Bibliografia

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