Content and language integrated learning in Latin America 2008-2018: Ten years of research and practice

Main Article Content

Dario Luis Banegas
Paige Michael Poole
Kathleen A. Corrales

Abstract

Bilingual education, usually a community’s L1 and English continues spreading geographically and across educational systems worldwide. With this expansion, the development of bilingual education approaches is under constant scrutiny. One recent approach is content and language integrated learning (CLIL). European in origin, CLIL can be viewed as an educational or language teaching approach and it refers to the teaching of curricular content and L2 in an integrated manner. This approach has received international attention, yet, how CLIL unfolds in settings outside Europe appears underrepresented in international publications. The aim of this article is to provide a critical review of CLIL in Latin America between 2008 and 2018. We surveyed 64 items (articles, book chapters, and dissertations) published in regional and international outlets: 41 empirical studies, 19 practice-oriented publications, and four reviews. It begins by summarizing the CLIL continuum with a focus on content- and language-driven CLIL and CLIL frameworks. It then provides a synthesis of empirical studies and practice-oriented publications about CLIL in different Latin American settings. The corpus is analyzed following these unifying themes: pedagogy, perceptions and beliefs, teacher education, global citizenship, and language development. From this review, it transpires that Latin American CLIL is mostly implemented and examined from a language-driven perspective in private primary, secondary and higher education. Suggestions and implications for further research and practice are included.

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Author Biographies

Dario Luis Banegas, University of Strathclyde, UK; Ministry of Education in Chubut, Argentina

Dario Luis Banegas is a lecturer in TESOL at the University of Strathclyde, UK, and an associate fellow with the University of Warwick, UK. In Argentina, he supports continuing professional development initiatives usually through action research. He is also a visiting lecturer at different Latin American universities. His main teaching and research interests are CLIL, initial English language teacher education, and action research.

Contact details: School of Education, University of Strathclyde, Lord Hope Building, 141 St James Road, G4 0LT, Glasgow, United Kingdom (dario.banegas@strath.ac.uk)

Paige Michael Poole, Universidad del Norte, Colombia

Paige Michael Poole is Foreign Language Professor at the Universidad del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia, where she currently coordinates and teaches in the English programs with a cultural emphasis. She holds an MA in TESOL studies from the University of Leeds and has published on CLIL, materials design, global simulation, teacher development, and project-based learning. She is also interested in research related to intercultural and international competence development and international virtual exchanges.

Contact details: Foreign Languages Department, Universidad del Norte, KM 5 Vía Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla, Colombia (ppoole@uninorte.edu.co)

Kathleen A. Corrales, Universidad del Norte, Colombia

Kathleen A. Corrales is a professor, researcher, and Academic Coordinator of the Instituto de Idiomas at the Universidad del Norte, Colombia. She is an interdisciplinary scholar whose interests lie in the intersection of language teaching and learning, content and language integrated learning (CLIL), development of international and intercultural competences, and business communication. As a member of the Colombian COLCIENCIAS-ranked research group, Language and Education, she has participated in research projects and has published articles and chapters on these areas.

Contact details: Foreign Languages Department, Universidad del Norte, KM 5 Vía Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla, Colombia (kwade@uninorte.edu.co)

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