Between Official Truth and Personal Memory: Oral Histories of Civilians and Soldiers in the Post-Yugoslav Wars 1991–1995

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Nebojša Petrović
Aleksandra Lazić

Abstract

In times of violent conflicts, societies tend to promote narratives that enable successful coping with the situation. Official collective memory can thus provide foundation for a group’s belonging, mobilization, persistence. On the other hand, it often perpetuates the animosity by, for example, delegitimizing (and often dehumanizing) the other side. In this article, we explore whether unofficial personal memories of a violent conflict could mitigate the damage in intergroup relations done by the dominating narratives. We conducted a secondary thematic analysis of 38 interviews with civilians and soldiers in the Post-Yugoslav wars (1991–1995). The themes we report here offer deeply personal and humanizing accounts of the war experience, which have largely remained outside traditional historiography.

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How to Cite
Petrović, N., & Lazić, A. (2019). Between Official Truth and Personal Memory: Oral Histories of Civilians and Soldiers in the Post-Yugoslav Wars 1991–1995. Poznańskie Studia Slawistyczne, (16), 227-241. https://doi.org/10.14746/pss.2019.16.13
Section
Między amnezją i anamnezą. Indywidualna pamięć historyczna wobec dominujących narracji

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