Tartan Polonaise: Scottish Crime Fiction in Poland

Main Article Content

Marta Crickmar

Abstrakt

This paper examines the position of contemporary Scottish crime fiction in the Polish polysystem. It investigates the definition of tartan noir and the challenges the genre poses in translation.Such concerns seem especially valid in the case of Denise Mina in whose Paddy Meehan series, next to the female protagonist, one of the most important characters is the city of Glasgow with its menacing architecture and the coarse language of its inhabitants. Thus the second part of this paper analyses the Polish translations of Mina’s trilogy in order to show how the dialect and other culture-specific items have been dealt with by two Polish translators.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

Jak cytować
Crickmar, M. (2014). Tartan Polonaise: Scottish Crime Fiction in Poland. Glottodidactica. An International Journal of Applied Linguistics, 41(1), 89-101. https://doi.org/10.14746/gl.2014.41.1.6
Dział
Artykuły

Bibliografia

  1. Ashley, K., 2007. Scots Abroad: The International Reception of Scottish Literature. In: Schoene, B. (ed.). The Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Literature. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 345-354.
  2. Bold, A., 1983. Modern Scottish Literature. London–New York: Longman.
  3. Berezowski, L., 1997. Dialect in Translation. Wrocław: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego.
  4. Brown, I., Riach A. (eds), 2009. Edinburgh Companion to Twentieth-Century Scottish Literature. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  5. Burszta, W.J., Czubaj M., 2007. Krwawa setka. 100 najważniejszych powieści kryminalnych. Warszawa: Warszawskie Wydawnictwo Literackie Muza SA.
  6. Cairns, P., Macleod, I. (eds), 2004. The Essential Scots Dictionary: Scots-English, English- Scots. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  7. Calder, A., 2008. Scotlands of the Mind. Edinburgh: Luath Press Limited.
  8. Corbett, J., 1997. Language and Scottish Literature. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  9. Czubaj, M., 2010. Etnolog w Mieście Grzechu. Gdańsk: Oficynka.
  10. Dobrołęcki, Piotr, Rynek książki w Polsce 2012. http://www.instytutksiazki.pl/upload/Files/rynek_ksiazki_2012.pdf (date of access: 20.10.2013).
  11. Even-Zohar, I., 2004. The Position of Translated Literature within the Literary Polysystem. In: Venuti, L. (ed.). Translation Studies Reader. London–New York: Routledge,199-204.
  12. Gardiner, M., 2009. Arcades – The 1980s and 1990s. In: Brown, I., Riach A. (eds). Edinburgh Companion to Twentieth-Century Scottish Literature. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 181-192.
  13. Gifford, D., Dunnigan, S., MacGillivray, A. (eds), 2002. Scottish Literature. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  14. Innes, K., Scottish crime writing. http://www.list.co.uk/article/5378-scottish-crime-writing/ (date of access: 20.10.2013).
  15. Johnstone, D., How William McIlvanney invented tartan noir. http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/aug/11/william-mcillvanney-tartan-noir (date of access: 20.10.2013).
  16. Korzeniowska, A., 2004. The challenge of the non-standard and the notion of untranslatability in reference to three Scottish writers: Tom Leonard, James Kelman and William McIlvanney. In: Kubińska, O., Kubiński, W. (eds). Przekładając nieprzekładalne. Vol. 2. Gdańsk: Wydawnictwo UG, 93-100.
  17. Miller, J., 2003. Syntax and Discourse in Modern Scots. In: Corbett, J., McClure, D., Stuart Smith, J. (eds). The Edinburgh Companion to Scots. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 72-109.
  18. Mina, D., 2007a. The Dead Hour. London: Bentam Books.
  19. Mina, D., 2007b. The Last Breath. London: Bantam Press.
  20. Mina, D., 2008. Pole krwi. Warszawa: W.A.B.
  21. Mina, D., 2009. Martwa godzina. Warszawa: W.A.B.
  22. Mina, D., 2010. Ostatnie tchnienie. Warszawa: W.A.B.
  23. Mina, D., 2011. The Field of Blood. London: Orion Books.
  24. Pittin-Hédon, M.O., 2009. Scottish Contemporary Popular and Genre Fiction In: Brown, I., Riach A. (eds). Edinburgh Companion to Twentieth-Century Scottish Literature. Edinburgh:Edinburgh University Press, 193-203.
  25. Purves, D., 2001. A Scots Grammar: Scots Grammar & Usage. The Saltire Society.