Reading the Ironic Layers of the (Re)construction: The Colony and its (Colonial?) Others in the Construct of “Austrian Bosnia” in The Bridge on Drina River BY iVO ANDRIĆ

Main Article Content

Boris Škvorc

Abstract

This text offers a reading of Ivo Andrić’s novel The Bridge on Drina River (1945) placing special emphasis on the economies of utterance and the (re)construction of sto-ry/myth produced from the position of various native informants at the level of authorial intent. It argues that the position of colonial subjects/objects in the novel, as uttered and emphasised by Andrić could best be read from a post-colonial perspective. That opens two possibilities of reading Andrić and South Slavic historical novels in general. The first one concerns the understanding of space of the South European narration/stereotyping as the space of imperial/colonial power games. The second one deals with consequences of that presumption and appropriation of histori-cal realms that deal with the space of narration in connection with various latter naturalisation of the text(s). The emphasis is put on Andrić’s novel. However, this reading of the text’s construc-tions also opens the way of re-reading other “historical” novels and their ideological/political constructs in South Slavic and wider Central European/Eastern European context/discourse.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

How to Cite
Škvorc, B. (2015). Reading the Ironic Layers of the (Re)construction: The Colony and its (Colonial?) Others in the Construct of “Austrian Bosnia” in The Bridge on Drina River BY iVO ANDRIĆ. Porównania, 16, 71-88. https://doi.org/10.14746/p.2015.16.10865
Section
Articles

References

  1. Bakhtin Mihail. The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays by M.M. Bakhtin. Ed. Michael Holquist. Trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981.
  2. Benjamin Walter. One-Way Street. Trans. E. Jephcott and K. Shorter. London: New Left Books, 1979.
  3. Bhaba K. Homi. The Location of Culture. London: Routledge, 1994.
  4. Eco Umberto. Interpretation and Overinterpretation. London: Cambridge University Press, 1992.
  5. Foucault Michel. Power/Knowledge: Selected Inteviews and Other Writings, 1972–1977. Ed. Colin Gordon. New York: Pantheon, 1980.
  6. Frye Northop. The Anatomy of Criticism. Four Essays. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1957.
  7. Hamilton Paul. Historicism. London: Routledge 2002.
  8. Iser Wolfgang. Prospecting. From Reader Response to Literary Anthropology. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1989.
  9. Jackson Robert de Jeger. Historical Criticism and the Meaning of the Text. London: Routledge, 1989.
  10. Munslow Alun. Deconstructing History. Second Edition. London: Routledge, 2006.
  11. Spivak Gayatri Chakravorty. A Critique of Postcolonial Reason: Towards a History of Vanishing Presence. Boston: Harvard University Press, 1999.
  12. Todorova Maria. Imagining the Balkans. Oxford and New York: Oxford Univerity Press. Updated Edition, 2009.
  13. White Hayden. The Tropics of Discourse: Essays in Cultural Criticism. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1978.