The Last Day and Brexit: Delusions of Future Past

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Justyna Jajszczok

Abstract

The paper aims to show how the traditions of science fiction and, above all, invasion literature provide the ideological background for reading Andrew Hunter Murray’s The Last Day as a novel about Brexit. As it draws on anxious visions of the future, in which the enemy lurks around every corner, and the only salvation is complete isolation from the world, Murray’s work is read here as a Brexit dream come true, in which Britain is once again great, independent and uncontaminated by foreign elements. By evoking the myths that focus only on glory and conveniently “forget” the dark sides of the empire, the novel demonstrates that the fantasies of the past are as distant as the fantasies of the future; the loss of the world that never was is reworked in The Last Day into the loss of ecologically viable planet.

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How to Cite
Jajszczok, J. (2021). The Last Day and Brexit: Delusions of Future Past. Porównania, 30(3), 167-177. https://doi.org/10.14746/por.2021.3.11
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Articles
Author Biography

Justyna Jajszczok, Uniwersytet Śląski w Katowicach

Justyna Jajszczok, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Literary Studies, University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland. Her research interests include Victorian science and fiction, future-war and invasion narratives, and infection literature, with a particular focus on metaphors of science and medicine in literary and cultural discourse. In 2019, she co-edited (with Aleksandra Musiał) a volume in the Routledge Studies in Cultural History series devoted to the body and the corporeal in various historical, cultural and literary contexts. In 2021, together with Alicja Bemben, she guest-edited a special issue of the World and Word journal devoted to science in popular culture.

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