Proposing a comprehensive framework for needs analysis in ESP – on the integrality of needs analysis in Business English course design

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PIOTR ROMANOWSKI

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The present paper discusses the importance of needs analysis in ESP. By delving into different theories, the author’s overall objective is to scrutinize a wide spectrum of existing frameworks that would lead to a single, comprehensive model for needs assessment. The impact of the said approaches on course design is underlined with the particular example of Business English. Ultimately, the author unveils a framework which could serve as a basis for syllabus design in all types of ESP courses.

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ROMANOWSKI, P. (1). Proposing a comprehensive framework for needs analysis in ESP – on the integrality of needs analysis in Business English course design. Glottodidactica. An International Journal of Applied Linguistics, 44(2), 147-159. https://doi.org/10.14746/gl.2017.44.2.09
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